June 2021

first_img Related: By Sheila Kaplan Feb. 8, 2016 Reprints Senator Roy Blunt, the Missouri Republican who chairs the Senate Appropriations subcommittee that oversees the Department of Health and Human Services, said he will meet tomorrow with HHS Secretary Sylvia Burwell to discuss the request. In an email to STAT this afternoon, he proposed using some of the remaining Emergency Ebola funding, now at $1.5 billion, to underwrite the Zika program. Are you at risk of contracting Zika virus?Volume 90%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard ShortcutsEnabledDisabledPlay/PauseSPACEIncrease Volume↑Decrease Volume↓Seek Forward→Seek Backward←Captions On/OffcFullscreen/Exit FullscreenfMute/UnmutemSeek %0-9 facebook twitter Email Linkhttps://www.statnews.com/2016/02/08/emergency-funding-zika-virus/?jwsource=clCopied EmbedCopiedLive00:0001:3301:33  Are you at risk for contracting Zika virus? Your level of risk depends in part on your living conditions. Alex Hogan/STAT “In December, we significantly increased funding for the NIH, CDC, and other agencies that deal with emerging threats,” Blunt said. “Given the Zika outbreak, protecting Americans, especially children, is an even higher priority moving forward.”“Hopefully the president’s budget will explain how his request will prioritize this emerging threat. In the short term, there is still $1.5 billion in funding remaining in the Ebola response fund that the administration can use for other infectious disease response efforts. ”White House press secretary Josh Earnest called Zika funding the kind of issue that shouldn’t break down along party lines. Yet asked whether Congress might try to ensure that any federal funds not be used for abortions — pregnant women who contract Zika are believed to be at heightened risk of delivering a child with birth defects — Earnest acknowledged the threat of a holdup.Currently, federal funds may not be used for abortions, with certain exemptions.“Hopefully questions like that will not impede Congress’s ability to act quickly,” Earnest said.The bulk of the request, $1.48 billion, would go to the Department of Health and Human Services, for mosquito control, improving response in the states, implementing surveillance, and improving birth defect registries across the country. The administration also asked for $250 million for the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which would fund a temporary one-year increase in health service assistance to Puerto Rico.  Another $200 million would be allotted for development of vaccines and diagnostic testing not only for Zika, but also for chikungunya virus, which is carried by the same mosquitos that transmit Zika.The administration is also seeking $210 million to establish a new and urgent emerging threat fund to address the Zika virus and other outbreaks. This money would also be available to states for emerging public health problems. There are also funds requested for the US Agency for International Development and the State Department.The story has been updated to include comments from Senator Blunt. In response to mounting concern over the spreading Zika virus, the Obama administration on Monday asked Congress for more than $1.8 billion in emergency funding to fight the disease in the United States and abroad.In a statement, the White House said the additional funds are needed to build on the nation’s ongoing efforts to combat the rapidly expanding virus; increase mosquito control programs; accelerate vaccine research and diagnostic development; enable the testing and procurement of vaccines; and educate health care providers. PoliticsObama administration seeks more than $1.8 billion to fight Zika virus A graduate student analyzes samples to identify the Zika virus in a laboratory at the Fiocruz institute in Rio de Janeiro. Leo Correa/APcenter_img Everything you need to know about Zika virus Tags Congressglobal healthpolicyZika Virus “There is much that we do not yet know about Zika and its relationship to the poor health outcomes that are being reported in Zika-affected areas,” the White House said. “We must work aggressively to investigate these outbreaks, and mitigate, to the best extent possible, the spread of the virus. Congressional action on the administration’s request will accelerate our ability to prevent, detect, and respond to the Zika virus and bolster our ability to reduce the potential for future infectious disease outbreaks.”It’s unclear how quickly Congress might act.advertisement The money would also be used to educate pregnant women and their partners. The Zika virus is thought to be associated with birth defect microcephaly, which causes babies to be born with small heads and brains.advertisementlast_img read more

first_img Seth Berkley, CEO of Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. Leigh Vogel for STAT By Helen Branswell July 22, 2016 Reprints Please enter a valid email address. @HelenBranswell Senior Writer, Infectious Disease Helen covers issues broadly related to infectious diseases, including outbreaks, preparedness, research, and vaccine development. The alliance currently helps 73 of the poorest countries in the world buy vaccines, some at heavily subsidized prices. Children from those countries make up 60 percent of the kids born every year.Dr. Seth Berkley has been the Geneva-based organization’s CEO for the past five years. He sat down recently to tell STAT about Gavi and to discuss the underutilization of yellow fever vaccine, as well as the prospects for Ebola and Zika vaccines. This transcript has been edited for length and clarity.advertisement Newsletters Sign up for Daily Recap A roundup of STAT’s top stories of the day. Obama briefed on Zika virus, urges faster work to develop tests and vaccines Helen Branswell To control spread of yellow fever, panel approves WHO plan to ration vaccine HealthHow a vaccine advocate aims to provide life-saving tools to the poor Related: Related: At the beginning of the 20th century, surviving childhood was a not a given. One out of every 10 American children died before their first birthday.While childhood mortality rates sank like a stone in developed countries over the last century, those gains were slower to materialize in developing countries, in part because of a lack of access to vaccines. These life-saving tools are still a stretch, financially, for some low-income countries.In recognition of that fact, a public-private partnership known as Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, was established in 2000 to help poor countries gain access to the vaccines that the World Health Organization says every child should have.advertisement This is a fabulous vaccine. It’s one-dose, lifetime, very effective, relatively inexpensive. So this is one where you really want to make sure there’s good coverage.Yellow fever vaccine is made in eggs, an old and slow process. A more modern approach would allow for more rapid scale-up of production, when it’s needed. But a new yellow fever vaccine would cost a lot of money to bring to market. Who’s going to pay for that?These are some of the debates that we’re having more broadly in infectious diseases. How do you put incentives in place to make sure these products are developed?This is a whole new space for the world. Because traditionally most of the vaccines GAVI uses are vaccines that are used in the West, as well. There’s a [profitable] market to amortize the research into.Let’s talk about Ebola. It’s great that there is finally evidence that one of the experimental vaccines, produced by Merck, protects people. Are you hopeful at this point?Oh yes, I’m quite hopeful. And part of that is we have an agreement with Merck to move forward.Our agreement with Merck had three components. One was for them to submit an emergency use authorization application to WHO, so that if there was an emergency, the vaccine would be ready to go. Second was to have 300,000 doses produced and ready to be used in case of an emergency. And then third was to submit an application for licensure by the end of 2017.So I think that will happen. I think the bigger and more complicated issue is: How do we move to second-generation vaccines, and how do we move to vaccines that are idealized for prevention?If our goal was to protect a health worker, for example, that might not be the ideal vaccine to use. Maybe one of the [two-dose] prime-boost regimes or something else might be a more effective way to get sustained antibodies.And at the end of the day, this is an Ebola Zaire [vaccine]. Should we have an Ebola Zaire-Sudan-Bundibugyo, etc [vaccine]? Should we have a Marburg [vaccine]? So one of the issues is: What are the incentives in place to get companies to move for a next generation vaccine?Has the world figured out how to create a system where vaccines that don’t have a traditional market — but for which there is a huge need — are developed?Donors have not been necessarily lining up to provide support. Some have been interested and are going to help.But one of the issues … we need to make sure that people understand is that if we don’t pay for vaccines when we ask companies to put the effort in, then they’re not necessarily going to be there the next time or the next time.So it really comes down to a risk appetite. If we want to have the companies engaged, if we want to have the vaccines available, we have to be willing to pay for them. Leave this field empty if you’re human: Now, there’s a contract there. If the companies aren’t willing to throw in their effort, it becomes a problem. In other words, if this were seen as a “Let’s get maximum prices during these [emergency] periods,” I think people would be quite upset about that.But I think, on the other hand, if companies are going to step up to the plate and do something, they need to be remunerated for their work. Otherwise, we’re going to have a problem with engaging them in the future.What do you think the prospects are for a Zika vaccine?I think technically it doesn’t look like that agent is going to be that hard. I think the bigger problem is we didn’t have animal models for it [Zika infection].We were lucky with Ebola that we had vaccine candidates already made and we had reasonable animal models. We knew you could get protection in animal models. So it was easy to then accelerate products. But here, you’re really struggling a little bit.So it’s sounding like a Zika vaccine is not in the near-near term?It’s certainly not in the near-near term. About the Author Reprints How many types of vaccines do you distribute?We now have 15 different vaccines that are being used, some of which are regional and some of which are for all children. WHO now has 11 vaccines that they suggest all children should have, plus HPV, which is obviously for adolescents. Who pays for them?There’s no free lunch here. Everybody pays something. So countries pay a very small amount, 20 cents [per vaccine dose], when they first come in as low-income countries. As they move into a lower-middle income [status] they then go up 15 percent per year, and that depends upon how fast they grow so it could be a long time or a short time.And when they cross the threshold of $1,580 dollars [of gross national income], they then move into transition. And they have five years to take on the full cost of the vaccine.What’s the philosophy around requiring countries to pay?The idea is to focus our resources on the very poor countries who, realistically, within their financial envelope, could not afford these live-saving vaccines.Where does your funding come from?So we receive from numerous sovereign donors. The US, for example, is a big supporter of us. The UK. Norway. The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation is a very, very large supporter. Bill was involved in the founding of GAVI — he’s been there from the beginning. So pretty broad support.Do you think the ongoing large yellow fever outbreak in Angola and the Democratic Republic of Congo, which is stretching global vaccine supplies, will galvanize at-risk countries to make more of an effort to vaccinate against the virus?I hope so.It’s one thing to have a disease appear in a country that hasn’t experienced it before. But it’s another thing to have it part of the routine immunization but have very low coverage, and, therefore, have it not be effective. I think one of the challenges here is that countries need to really take it seriously and get coverage up. Privacy Policy Tags global healthVaccinesyellow feverlast_img read more

first_imgBusinessHow genetic testing of dubious value is infiltrating the world of sports Consumers aren’t wild about genetic testing — nor are doctors Molly Ferguson for STAT Related: Related: Such tests “have no role to play in talent identification or the individualised prescription of training to maximise performance,” according to a consensus statement published last year in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, signed by two dozen experts in genomics and sports performance.Or as Harvard geneticist Dr. Robert Green puts it: “The notion that they’re somehow tailoring these recommendations on the basis of your DNA is nonsense.”advertisement Unproven dietary supplements get a new champion: Olympic teams That hasn’t stopped such claims from proliferating. The number of companies selling fitness-oriented consumer genetic tests grew to at least 39 last year, nearly double the market size in 2013. They’re part of a booming industry of lifestyle-oriented consumer genetic tests, which purport to use your DNA to tell you everything from how to eat to which supplements to take to what kind of wine you’ll like.Companies marketing these tests, which generally cost a few hundred dollars, say they’re aware of the field’s limitations.“We deliberately under-claim everything. We do not want to overstate what genetics can do,” said Andrew Steele, product head for UK-based DNAFit — and a bronze medalist in track in the 2008 Beijing Games.How coaches use the information is up to them, “because there’s no data to say that you should use them in one way or another,” said Dr. Paul Billings, the chief medical officer of Berkeley, Calif.-based Kinetic Diagnostics, which until recently sold a $400 genetic test for athletes but has stopped taking orders as it refines its business model.Marketing in gyms and an NFL stadiumDespite the limitations of genetic analysis, other companies are still pushing these tests as powerful tools that can give athletes a winning edge.Recreational athletes are one key market: “The lowest hanging fruit … are the millions of people who are trying to do something” about their weight or fitness, said Kurt Johnsen, CEO of Texas-based Simplified Genetics, which sells “Simply Fit” tests for $249 and $499.Companies are also moving full-speed ahead in courting coaches and personal trainers.Johnsen, a former yoga instructor, said his company is negotiating a deal with a chain of fitness clubs that would add the Simply Fit test to a premium gym membership. He wouldn’t name the gym, but he said it’s a national chain. By Rebecca Robbins Nov. 2, 2016 Reprints Please enter a valid email address. “Is your workout working?” asks a Simply Fit brochure, which Johnsen said he uses to present the test to potential customers in the fitness world. The brochure promises that once the test has “provided you with the most accurate information for your genotype, you will be able to reach your fitness goals with our thorough reports of what to DO, EAT and TAKE.”Athletigen, meanwhile, is in the planning stages of a partnership with Baylor football that would use players’ genetic data to design personalized training programs. The company touts its use of “cutting edge sports science” to help athletes “reach their highest levels of performance.” (Baylor didn’t respond to repeated requests for comment.)Meanwhile, Orig3n, a Boston-based biotech with a side business selling consumer genetic tests, is using the cachet of a top NFL team to market its services. An Orig3n booth inside Levi’s Stadium, where the San Francisco 49ers play, collects blood from fans for medical research — and sells a $149 do-it-yourself genetic test kit that promises to give you “unprecedented insights about your fitness potential.”To sweeten the deal, you’ll also get entered into a contest to win a signed 49ers football, helmet, or jersey.Brent Schoeb, the team’s vice president of corporate partnerships, didn’t respond to questions about the science behind the genetic tests, except to say that “our goal is to ensure that Orig3n generates positive brand awareness through the relationship.”Notably not participating in all the genotyping: 49ers players themselves. Privacy Policy NewslettersSign up for The Readout Your daily guide to what’s happening in biotech. Athletes are keeping their distance from a genetic test for concussion risks And there’s concern among academic researchers that genetic test companies tend to cite studies “inappropriately,” using “selective quotations or taking little bit of information and extrapolating way beyond what we say,” said Alun Williams, a geneticist who studies sports and exercise at Britain’s Manchester Metropolitan University and coauthored the 2015 consensus statement.Yet another problem, experts say: Associations observed in large studies of thousands of people don’t necessarily translate into useful advice for individuals.Harvard’s Green illustrates the flaw this way: Imagine that you have thousands of people. Half of them have a genetic variant linked to sprinting speed; they get green jerseys. The other half have a genetic variant associated with no advantage in sprinting; they get red jerseys.Line them up side by side, blow your whistle, and send them off on a short foot race. On average, the runners with the “speed” marker will probably finish a few steps ahead of the runners without it. But the race will be a big blur of color, reds and greens mixed together, undetectable to the eye who’s faster.“It’s the difference between a population finding where with enough people you do see a statistically significant difference, and the ability to turn around and use that as a predictive tool in an individual person,” said Green, who also practices at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.Spent the day today at @ALTISworld onboarding world leaders in athletic performance to Iris! #CarryTheShield https://t.co/1o8zVat3VF pic.twitter.com/sjKg913VWR— Athletigen (@Athletigen) October 25, 2016 Tailoring workouts to a genetic readoutDespite the shaky science, the promise of harnessing genetics info is tantalizing enough that some athletes and coaches are jumping in.ALTIS, an Arizona training facility, has worked with Canada-based testing company Athletigen in recent years to genotype elite track and field athletes. Just last week, some of the athletes got set up with a smartphone app. It includes a dashboard where they can pull up Athletigen’s interpretation of their genetic data, which might include “high sensitivity to caffeine,” “normal sensitivity to saturated fats,” and “normal daily calorie intake.”In a demo on Athletigen’s website, coaches get a version that lets them hone in on each athlete’s data. (Sample updates might include the fact that training load has been “trending up” over the past two weeks).Athletigen CEO Jeremy Koenig emphasizes that his company isn’t making recommendations on how to use the data.That’s up to coaches like Dan Pfaff.Pfaff, the ALTIS head coach, said when he designs training regimens for some athletes, he considers whether they have genetic variants associated with more difficult recovery from exercise. If so, they might get more days off or shorter workout sessions. Or they might move practice from the track to the more forgiving grass.How about those who might be genetically predisposed to tendon injuries? They may get a more intense daily orthopedic exam. Leave this field empty if you’re human: Pfaff speaks cautiously about the promise of genetic testing for athletes. He insists that he and other ALTIS coaches never use genetic testing to identify talent. They never make decisions based on a single genetic marker, instead pooling together, say, seven to 10 genetic markers to decide if an athlete is predisposed to have trouble recovering from exercise.Pfaff bristles when people uniformly dismiss all companies in the space as “charlatans and snake oil salesmen,” he said. But he acknowledges it’s too early to say for sure if the Athletigen tests have helped his athletes.Some athletes who have tried it have no such hesitation.British long jumper Greg Rutherford was quoted in a press release this past spring saying that acting on the results of his DNAFit test was helping him hit “huge personal bests in the weight room.”Rutherford went on to win a bronze medal in this past summer’s Rio Olympics. He’s now a paid spokesperson for DNAFit. Gathering evidence to back up adviceAs proof that they’re on to something, the testing companies point to a small but growing body of scientific literature exploring how genetic differences contribute to individual strength, flexibility, speed, and propensity for injuries. And some companies say they’re steadily gathering additional evidence to back up their advice.Consider a study supported by DNAFit and published earlier this year. Researchers performed genetic analysis on 28 athletes from different sports and then randomly assigned them to either a high- or low-intensity training program.Half the group was assigned to the training style that DNAFit’s algorithm recommended for them based on their genes; the other half was assigned to the training style deemed inappropriate.After eight weeks, the “matched” group performed better on measures of explosive power and aerobic fitness than the “mismatched” group. (The athletes didn’t know which group they were in; nor did those evaluating their fitness.) Similar results were seen in another study on 39 soccer players, reported in the same paper.One caveat: Such studies are often small and in homogenous populations. The study on DNAFit, for instance, looked at just male college students at a university in northern England. Related: Genetic analysis companies are forging alliances with personal trainers, chiropractors, and coaches around the world to market genomics tests that they say can help athletes at all levels tailor their workouts to their DNA.They have struck deals with the Baylor University football team in Texas, with soccer teams in the English Premier League and in Egypt, and with an elite training facility in Arizona for top track and field athletes, including several who competed in the Rio Games.Yet there is little science to back up the claims that a genetic analysis could identify if a particular athlete is, say, predisposed to benefit from a certain type of exercise, prone to tendon injuries, or wired to have trouble recovering from tough workouts.advertisement Tags genetic analysisgenetic testingsports medicinelast_img read more

first_img GET STARTED Log In | Learn More By Ed Silverman Jan. 20, 2017 Reprints Pharmalot What is it? Forget about fake news, the FDA found fake quality control Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Ed Silverman Chinese workers watch the production line of pill capsules at the Tongrentang factory in Beijing, in 2007. The US FDA increased its inspections in 2008 after a string of health scandals surrounding Chinese-made goods. Alex Hogan/STAT Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTEDcenter_img Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. There is fake news, and then there is fake quality control.In the latest startling example of how some foreign companies run their operations, a Chinese drug maker was cited for failing to have a quality control unit and faking quality control documents, according to a warning letter issued by the US Food and Drug Administration. [email protected] @Pharmalot What’s included? About the Author Reprints STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Tags FDApatientspharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

first_img Martin Shkreli has become the drug industry’s favorite scapegoat. Susan Walsh/AP Revenge of the hoodie: Martin Shkreli fires back at the drug industry Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED GET STARTED Meghana Keshavan By Meghana Keshavan Jan. 23, 2017 Reprints Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. What is it? Log In | Learn More Biotech Correspondent Meghana covers biotech and contributes to The Readout newsletter.center_img Pharma @megkesh STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Martin Shkreli is tired of being pharma’s favorite scapegoat.Shkreli, the former drug company CEO who rocketed to notoriety when he hiked the price of an old drug by 5,000 percent, routinely gets blamed by other pharma CEOs for tarnishing the reputation of the entire industry. On Monday, the trade group PhRMA launched a new multi-million dollar ad blitz specifically aimed at distancing itself from Shkreli. What’s included? [email protected] About the Author Reprints Tags biotechnologydrug pricingfinancepharmaceuticalslast_img read more

first_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Pharmalot What is it? How safe are the newest hepatitis C drugs? A new report raises questions About the Author Reprints Log In | Learn More What’s included? Harvoni, one of two hepatitis C treatments sold by Gilead Sciences, is included in a report on side effects. Gilead Ed Silverman @Pharmalot center_img [email protected] STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Unlock this article — plus daily coverage and analysis of the pharma industry — by subscribing to STAT+. First 30 days free. GET STARTED Over the past few years, billions of dollars have been spent on new hepatitis C medicines because they could eliminate the virus in 90 percent or more of patients. But a new report finds that hundreds of cases of liver failure were associated with the drugs, and the authors suggest that regulators may have been too quick to embrace the treatments as a panacea.Specifically, 524 cases of liver failure were found, along with another 1,058 reports of severe liver injury, according to side effects reports that were filed with the US Food and Drug Administration and reviewed by the Institute for Safe Medicine Practices. The nonprofit group also noted 761 instances in which the reported side effect was a failure of the medicines to combat the virus. The report arrives just three months after the FDA issued a warning that the drugs could reactivate hepatitis B. GET STARTED By Ed Silverman Jan. 25, 2017 Reprints Tags infectious diseasepharmaceuticalsSTAT+last_img read more

first_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Felipe Dana/AP STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. What is it? Sanofi Pasteur has rejected a request from the US Army to set an affordable US price for a Zika virus vaccine that the company is developing with American taxpayer funds, prompting an angry response from Senator Bernie Sanders.For months, Sanders has pushed the Army to negotiate a more favorable agreement with Sanofi, which is one of the world’s largest vaccine makers and which has already received a $43 million US research grant. But Sanofi recently refused, according to an Army timeline of events reviewed by STAT. By Ed Silverman May 17, 2017 Reprints Exclusive Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED What’s included? GET STARTEDcenter_img @Pharmalot Log In | Learn More Tags pharmaceuticalspolicypoliticsVaccinesZika Virus [email protected] Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. Ed Silverman About the Author Reprints Sanofi rejects US Army request for ‘fair’ pricing for a Zika vaccine last_img read more

first_img STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. GET STARTED Senior News Editor Paying off med school debt? The GOP tax proposal might end the student loan interest deduction Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Log In | Learn More About the Author Reprints Elaine Thompson/AP What’s included?center_img Tags CongresspolicyWhite House [email protected] Erin Mershon WASHINGTON — Newly minted doctors and other health care workers may lose a critical tax deduction under the tax code overhaul House Republican leaders unveiled Thursday.The proposal repeals the student loan interest deduction — a policy that helped more than 12 million Americans who racked up education loans save up to $2,500 on their tax bills in 2015. The popular policy doesn’t require taxpayers to itemize their deductions to claim it — instead, it’s available to anyone paying interest on either private or public student loans who makes less than $80,000 in a year. By Erin Mershon Nov. 2, 2017 Reprints @eemershon What is it? Politics last_img read more

first_img Pharmalot Columnist, Senior Writer Ed covers the pharmaceutical industry. What is it? Tags drug developmentfinancepharmaceuticalsSTAT+ [email protected] Pharmalot Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. @Pharmalot Takeda R&D chief says the Shire deal will accelerate plans by three to five years About the Author Reprintscenter_img Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. By Ed Silverman May 8, 2018 Reprints What’s included? Ed Silverman After months of pursuit, Takeda Pharmaceuticals (TKPYY) finally won over Shire (SHPG) with a $62 billion offer, a move that will create the world’s eighth-largest drug maker with combined sales worth $30 billion. And for Takeda chief executive Christophe Weber, the deal will cap his quest to expand the Japanese drug maker into more profitable markets, notably the U.S.Once completed — the target date is the first half of 2019 — the combined company will become a leader in therapies for a variety of maladies. But Takeda is borrowing cash to pay for the deal, worrying shareholders about its debt load, especially after borrowing money to buy Ariad Pharmaceuticals last year for $5 billion. Dr. Andrew Plump, Takeda chief medical and scientific officer Takeda GET STARTED Log In | Learn More last_img read more

first_img What is it? Adobe By Jake LaPorte Aug. 6, 2018 Reprints What’s included? STAT+ is STAT’s premium subscription service for in-depth biotech, pharma, policy, and life science coverage and analysis. Our award-winning team covers news on Wall Street, policy developments in Washington, early science breakthroughs and clinical trial results, and health care disruption in Silicon Valley and beyond. Daily reporting and analysis The most comprehensive industry coverage from a powerhouse team of reporters Subscriber-only newsletters Daily newsletters to brief you on the most important industry news of the day STAT+ Conversations Weekly opportunities to engage with our reporters and leading industry experts in live video conversations Exclusive industry events Premium access to subscriber-only networking events around the country The best reporters in the industry The most trusted and well-connected newsroom in the health care industry And much more Exclusive interviews with industry leaders, profiles, and premium tools, like our CRISPR Trackr. Tags clinical trialsdrug developmentresearchSTAT+ About the Author Reprints Log In | Learn More center_img Jake LaPorte First Opinion [email protected] Digital technologies hold the key to streamlining and improving clinical trials GET STARTED Unlock this article by subscribing to STAT+ and enjoy your first 30 days free! GET STARTED Clinical trials are an essential component of bringing new, innovative medicines to market and answering complex questions about whether experimental treatments are safe and effective enough to prescribe to patients.But the current model for clinical trials has some fundamental flaws that increasingly affect both patients and the entire health care system.last_img read more