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first_imgShare Share on Facebook Pinterest A study conducted at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health found that there were fewer drivers killed in car crashes who tested positive for opioids in states with medical marijuana laws than before the laws went into effect. The study is one of the first to assess the link between state medical marijuana laws and opioid use at the individual level. Findings will be published online in the American Journal of Public Health.Researchers analyzed 1999-2013 Fatality Analysis Reporting System data from 18 U.S. states that tested for alcohol and other drugs in at least 80 percent of drivers who died within one hour of crashing. They looked at opioid positivity among drivers ages 21 to 40 who crashed their cars in states with an operational medical marijuana law compared with drivers crashing in states before those laws went into effect. There was an overall reduction in opioid positivity for most states after implementation of an operational medical marijuana law.“We would expect the adverse consequences of opioid use to decrease over time in states where medical marijuana use is legal, as individuals substitute marijuana for opioids in the treatment of severe or chronic pain,” explained June H. Kim, MPhil, a doctoral student in the Department of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health, and lead author. Emailcenter_img LinkedIn Share on Twitter Among the 68,394 deceased drivers, approximately 42 percent were fatally injured in states that had an operational medical marijuana laws, 25 percent died in states before an operational law went into effect, and 33 percent died in states that had never passed a medical marijuana law.In 1996, California was the first state to pass a voter-initiated medical marijuana law. Since then, 22 additional states and the District of Columbia have enacted their own medical marijuana laws either by voter initiatives or through state legislation.“The trend may have been particularly strong among the age group surveyed because minimum age requirements restrict access to medical marijuana to patients age 21 and older, and most medical marijuana patients are younger than 45,” noted Kim. According to the authors, they would expect to see similar reductions in opioid use among older cohorts if medical marijuana is increasingly embraced by older generations.“This study is about the possible substitution relationship between marijuana and opioids. The toxicological testing data for fatally injured drivers lend some suggestive evidence that supports the substitution hypothesis in young adults, but not in older adults,”said Guohua Li, MD, DrPH, Mailman School professor of Epidemiology, the founding director of the Center for Injury Epidemiology and Prevention at Columbia, and senior author.“As states with these laws move toward legalizing marijuana more broadly for recreational purposes, future studies are needed to assess the impact these laws may have on opioid use,” noted Kim.Co-authors are: Julian Santaella-Tenorio, Katherine M. Keyes, Deborah Hasin, and Silvia S. Martins with the Department of Epidemiology, Mailman School of Public Health; Christine Mauro and Julia Wrobel with the Department of Biostatistics, Mailman School of Public Health; and Magdalena Cerda` with the Department of Emergency Medicine, University of California, Davis.last_img

first_imgMore Vietnamese poultry farms affected by H5N1Two provinces in Vietnam have reported outbreaks of H5N1 avian flu in poultry, an article from Xinhua, China’s news agency, reported today. One of the outbreaks follows one in the same province late last month, raising alarm over the infection’s spread to other areas and to humans.On a farm in the Tinh Gia district of Thanh Hoa, a central province, 186 chickens testing positive for H5N1 died Feb 8, says the story. That farm as well as neighboring ones was asked by the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development to cull and safely dispose of all their chickens to contain the outbreak.The other outbreak occurred in the central highlands province of Kon Tum, where 600 chickens displayed symptoms of H5N1 and 470 died Feb 8. The story says the remaining 130 chickens on the farm were culled after “the official conclusion was reached” that they had H5N1. VNA, Vietnam’s state-run news agency, reported an outbreak Jan 28 in Kon Tum that involved 1,000 ill or dead chickens, the Xinhua story says.In a related development, a veterinarian who had contact with the birds in the Kon Tum outbreak is reportedly hospitalized and isolated with suspected H5N1 avian flu, says Xinhua. Vietnam has among the most human H5N1 cases in the world. Feb 11 Xinhua article 11 South Korean H5N8 outbreaks lead to 150,000 poultry deathsEleven outbreaks of H5N8 avian flu in South Korea this month and last led to the death of more than 150,000 poultry, the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE) reported yesterday.The outbreaks, 7 in January and 4 this month, affected farms ranging in size from 5,000 to 27,000 birds in six separate western and southern provinces. Outbreak-onset dates range from Jan 19 to Feb 6.All told, 11,080 poultry died from the virus and 140,620 were culled to prevent disease spread, accounting for 151,700 poultry deaths. Disinfection and other measures have begun, according to the OIE report, and the Veterinary Authority is implementing an epidemiologic survey.Feb 10 OIE reportlast_img read more

first_imgCLEVELAND, Ohio – Julius Brenner, founder of Ohio Technical College and an educational leader in the local community, passed away on Thursday, May 6.   “My father had an entrepreneurial spirit that many people respected, and his lifelong passion for education and leadership helped thousands of students meet their career goals,” said Brenner’s son Marc Brenner, president of Ohio Technical College. “He will be missed by the many family, friends and colleagues that had the privilege of calling him a friend, and we are proud to say his legacy will live on in the future lives changed at our college.”   Born Jan. 4, 1919, in Cleveland, Ohio, Brenner graduated from Glenville High School in 1939 and attended Fenn College. He served his country in the U.S. Army during World War II until he was discharged in November 1945.   Brenner’s entrepreneurial spirit led him to start the Ohio Diesel Mechanics School in 1969 to conduct six-week diesel training courses in Cleveland’s Warehouse district. That school has since grown from a one-room, six-student classroom to what is now known as Ohio Technical College – an 800,000-square-foot facility where more than 1,200 students receive training and education. Ohio Technical College has had many successes in its 40-year history, most recently being named the Tomorrow’s Technician 2009 School of the Year.   As an educational leader, Brenner was active in many local, state and national organizations, including the State Board of Career Colleges and Schools, the Ohio Council and the Northeast Ohio Chapter of Private Colleges and Schools, where he served as president. He retired in 1996 when his son Marc took over operations at the school.   Brenner enjoyed traveling throughout the United States and abroad, was an avid animal lover and also authored several books on dream fantasies and poetry. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

first_imgSuperintendent of Insurance Russell ToalSTATE News:SANTA FE – New Mexico Superintendent of Insurance Russell Toal urged all who have lost health insurance coverage or suffered loss of income to take action to obtain coverage as soon as possible.Thanks to the effort of Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham, there are options for coverage for New Mexicans who have lost insurance or income. “The Governor’s determination that every New Mexican should have the security of health coverage to ensure they can get the medical care they need is a shared determination with our office and all the health-related agencies of the state,” Superintendent Toal said. “I want to thank the Governor for making sure that we have a coordinated approach to making coverage options available and known to all, and I call on the media and the health insurance community to assist us in making those options widely known”.As shown on the attached flyer (in both English and Spanish), New Mexicans have three primary options beyond workplace coverage. The first option is coverage through the Medicaid program, which has no premiums or co-pays.Eligibility is tied to income. As the flyer indicates, New Mexicans can apply online at  yes.state.nm.us  or they can call 1-855-637-6574. Medicaid also has a COVID website: nmmedicaid.portal.conduent.com/static/covid. “Last month our office directed all health insurers in the state to cover the cost of COVID-19 testing and treatment without any patient cost-sharing,” Superintendent Toal said. “I commend the state Medicaid program for using the federal financial funding recently made available to the state to cover testing and testing-related services and the associated medical visit for all uninsured New Mexicans.”A copy of the Medicaid Supplement on COVID-19 testing is attached.An individual who may not qualify for Medicaid can seek coverage from the state’s Health Insurance Exchange, known as beWellnm, by contacting their broker or agent or by calling 1.833.862.3935. The Exchange can also be reached online at www.beWellnm.com.Depending on your income, you may qualify for premium payment assistance through the Exchange. New Mexicans who have lost insurance or have had a significant drop in income can apply for coverage within 60 days after such events. Those needing coverage should not wait for the normal fall open enrollment period. The third option for those who cannot get Medicaid or beWellnm coverage and who are uninsured is the New Mexico Medical Insurance Pool (NMMIP), whose board is chaired by the Superintendent.The NMMIP offers health coverage to all who reside in New Mexico, with discounts for low and middle income households.The NMMIP board recently approved a reduction in premiums for the balance of the year and an expedited eligibility process for anyone who is uninsured and has tested positive for COVID-19.Those interested in NMMIP coverage should contact their broker or agent or call 1.844.728.7896. New Mexicans also can visit www.nmmip.org.“I hope all brokers, agents and producers will actively assist those businesses and individuals who have lost coverage to explore all options for low cost health insurance coverage,” Superintendent Toal said.last_img read more

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first_imgGet instant access to must-read content today!To access hundreds of features, subscribe today! At a time when the world is forced to go digital more than ever before just to stay connected, discover the in-depth content our subscribers receive every month by subscribing to gasworld.Don’t just stay connected, stay at the forefront – join gasworld and become a subscriber to access all of our must-read content online from just $270. Subscribelast_img

first_imgSolicitors acting for children have spoken out this week about the dire quality of representation that some – by no means all – firms acting for parents are offering. I’ve been told stories of parents’ cases being handled by staff who are clearly not qualified for the job – in the most extreme instances, a receptionist and a secretary, but also frequently paralegals who are not experienced in family work. I have also been told about qualified solicitors who have taken on parents’ cases and then done absolutely no work on the case, not even responding to correspondence from the children’s lawyer. Children’s lawyers are increasingly encountering cases where no written evidence has been submitted at all on behalf of the parent, and a barrister has not even been instructed. With such poor representation for parents, why do these cases not unravel? The answer is that children’s lawyers are stepping in to fill the gaps – for example, by instructing counsel themselves where a parent’s representative has failed to do so. From what I have been told, the courts are increasingly coming to rely on the goodwill of children’s lawyers – who are all accredited members of the Law Society’s Children Panel – to shoulder the burden. And are they getting paid for this extra work? Far from it. The irony is that their fixed fee is actually lower than that which the parent’s adviser will receive: £2,761 compared with £3,589. You might wonder why children’s lawyers are prepared to shoulder this extra burden. The truth is that solicitors in this field are unlikely to be in it for the money. It’s vocational work, and everyone knows it. They would rather spend their evenings and weekends at their desk for no reward than see a child separated from its parents and taken into care without a full and fair hearing in which everyone was properly represented. With so much expected of them for so little financial reward, however, it is small wonder that there is a shortage of younger lawyers moving into this complex field of work. This growing problem of poor representation for parents cannot be allowed to continue. It’s unfair on the children’s lawyers who are shouldering the burden, it’s unfair on the parents, but most of all it is not fair on the children who could find themselves growing up in local authority care when they should be at home with their family.last_img read more

first_imgThe service has been designed specifically for Shell to help maximise safety and efficiency by supporting the identification of key operational weather windows whilst minimising costs.The weather data will be provided via an innovative web portal developed by MeteoGroup to deliver 24/7/365 access to seamless forecasting and other key information to logistics coordinators, marine controllers, surveyors, rig movers, OIMs, drillers and crane operators.In addition to the new web portal, several MeteoGroup products are utilised including fixed, route and aviation forecasts, lightening detection and synoptic charts. Forecasters also offer round the clock support and teleconferenced briefings. The project will be managed by a team working out of MeteoGroup’s Aberdeen office.”MeteoGroup aims to keep Shell’s seafarers safe and support confident risk management for the company’s European offshore operations,” commented Mark White, regional director MeteoGroup.HLPFI’s annual report on weather forecasting will be included in or January/February edition.www.meteogroup.comlast_img read more

first_imgThe University of Law has become the first academic institution to be granted permission to provide legal services.ULaw (UK) Limited, trading as the University of Law was granted an alternative business structure yesterday by the SRA, effective immediately.The licence allows the entity to undertake rights of audience, litigation, reserved instrument activities and administration of oaths.The licence will mean the expansion of the university’s Legal Advice Clinic, where trainee solicitors provide legal advice on a pro-bono basis to members of the public in various areas of social welfare law, supervised by experienced solicitors.The clinic, operated at the university’s London Bloomsbury Centre, gives trainees first-hand experience of dispute resolution and the chance to prepare them for the realities of practising law.John Latham, president and chief executive of ULaw, said: ‘Being the first university to be granted an ABS status means that we can provide trainees and our law firm and in-house clients with a market-leading proposition that will equip the trainees for the legal and commercial challenges they will face in today’s workplace.‘Being able to provide practical experiences in a client-facing environment is a fundamental part of the training needed for aspiring solicitors.’Solicitor Emma Douglas, who manages the trainee litigation programme for the university, is named as head of legal practice.The University of Law, formerly the College of Law, operates from eight locations in seven cities across England.Earlier this month it established a one-year foundation programme for international students wishing to progress to undergraduate study.Earlier this month, Nottingham Trent University claimed to be the first academic institution to apply for an ABS licence, which would be used to give students a better idea of how to run a legal practice.last_img read more

first_imgUSA: The American Short Line & Regional Railroad Association has entered into an agreement for Wabtec Railway Electronics to provide Positive Train Control to its member railways using a hosted multi-tenant back office system.This is designed to offer complete PTC back-office functionality within a package which is cost-effective for short line operators. ‘The implementation of PTC is one of the most complex and challenging projects to be mandated for the US rail system, particularly for our short line members, who often do not have the technical staff and expertise, but have a complicated role to play, integrating with multiple Class I systems’, said Judy Petry, President of Farmrail System and Chair of ASLRRA. ‘Via our agreement with Wabtec, ASLRRA can offer PTC back-office support at a price that is more reasonable for our small business railroad members, particularly those with multiple railroad entities.’ASLRRA represents 603 short line and regional railways and suppliers which operate around 76 000 track-km in 49 US states accounting for 29% of the national rail network. As well as the deal with Wabtec, it offers its members a PTC back-office from Herzog, grant writing expertise support from Bergmann, HDR and RL Banks & Associates, and PTC safety documentation development by Rockwell Collins.last_img read more