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and it has served her brilliantly in an 11-match unbeaten run. but a similar bill may never receive a Senate vote.N." says Maria Gloria Dominguez-Bello,Most active November soybeans finished up 8-3/4 cents or 0.Information about the project timeline, to view the Points Table of? and they said that co-workers sometimes made fun of his beard. (Read TIMEs affiliate link policy. a data analyst at Lake Michigan Air Directors Consortium.

to boost grain size by 20% in lab-grown wheat In a preprint posted on the bioRxiv server in May they report identifying multiple copies of a gene for grain size originally found in rice then bulking up wheat grains by mutating the genes using CRISPR gene-editing technology Many more traits beckon The new sequence "ushers in a new era in wheat genetics" says James Anderson a plant breeder at the University of Minnesota in St Paul who was not part of the effort For him and thousands of other wheat researchers bread wheat’s DNA has been an impenetrable thicket Natural breeding between two grasses many thousands of years ago gave rise to the durum wheat now used in pasta That hybrid was mated with yet another grass to yield the grain that makes everything from bread to beer all over the world But this interspecies mingling produced a genome more than five times the size of the human one harboring three sets of very similar chromosomes 21 pairs in all with six copies of most genes Lacking a map of this complex landscape wheat breeders had trouble tracking genes from generation to generation to see whether a crossing had worked and genetic engineers trying to alter a specific DNA sequence often did not know where to find it The consortium—born in 2005 as an initiative by Kansas farmers—has finally mapped the thicket by breaking out and sequencing each chromosome separately In contrast a genome published last year by a group of academics had some longer stretches of contiguous sequence but did not describe genes or order and orient them on the chromosomes The new genome "represents a major step forward" says JIC’s Michael Bevan whose group also produced a rival draft wheat genome last year before working with the consortium JIC researchers including Cristobal Uauy Ricardo Ramírez-González and Philippa Borrill have now built on the consortium’s data to document gene activity in different tissues and at various points of the plant’s life cycle They took 850 snapshots of messenger RNA levels to gauge which genes are active under conditions including drought pest attack and other kinds of stress aiming to trace networks of genes underlying yield and other traits With these surveys "we can see which of the copies are most useful to target" Borrill says So far consortium members and others have drawn on the genome for more than 100 published papers says the consortium’s executive director Kellye Eversole who is based in Bethesda Maryland Their finds are already being put to use For example commonly planted varieties won’t sprout unless the seeds have overwintered in the ground Last year plant geneticist Antje Rohde now at BASF in Ghent Belgium reported her team had pinned down a key gene responsible for the sprouting delay By disabling that gene using CRISPR the team hopes to shorten the wheat breeding cycle The genome could also help bolster wheat’s resistance to disease Drawing on the consortium data Curtis Pozniak and Kirby Nilsen at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon Canada found a gene that makes wheat stems stiffer and hence more resistant to stem-boring insect pests called sawflies Stiffer wheat has more copies of the gene Nilsen found which points to ways to protect other wheat varieties The genome could even aid human health says consortium co-leader Rudi Appels a molecular geneticist at Murdoch University in Perth Australia In Science Advances this week he fellow Murdoch University researcher Angéla Juhász and Odd-Arne Olsen from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences near Oslo report identifying 365 genes coding for wheat proteins that stimulate an immune or allergic response The data could help breeders aim for less problematic wheat—what Appels calls "my personal dream" "For the first time people working in wheat have the quality of resources that people have in other crops" says consortium co-founder Catherine Feuillet chief scientific officer at Inari Agriculture a new ag-biotech startup in Cambridge Massachusetts "We now have the tools to do [breeding] in a knowledge-based way"Open-minded OSTP Director John Holdren’s memo calls for public access to federally funded research papers M Hicks/Science A group of scientific publishers today announced a plan for allowing the public to read taxpayer-funded research papers for free by linking to journals’ own websites The publishers say that this will eliminate the need for federal agencies to archive the papers themselves to comply with a new government directive Details are sketchy however and it’s not yet clear whether the plan will accomplish everything that the government wants from agencies The plan is a response to a February memo from White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) Director John Holdren that asks federal science agencies to come up with a plan by 22 August for making peer-reviewed papers that they fund freely available within 12 months The memo would essentially extend a National Institutes of Health (NIH) policy that requires its grantees to submit copies of their papers to NIH’s full-text PubMed Central (PMC) archive for posting after a delay of up to a year to protect journal subscriptions Many publishers dislike PMC however because they say it is duplicative infringes on copyright and diverts readers from their own journal websites So they have proposed an alternative that would offer a way to let the public see full-text articles without creating more PubMed Centrals Organized in part by the Association of American Publishers (AAP) which represents many commercial and nonprofit journals the group calls its project the Clearinghouse for the Open Research of the United States (CHORUS) In a fact sheet that AAP gave to reporters the publishers describe CHORUS as a "framework" that would "provide a full solution for agencies to comply with the OSTP memo" As a starting point the publishers have begun to index papers by the federal grant numbers that supported the work That index called FundRef debuted in beta form last week You can search by agency and get a list of papers linked to the journal’s own websites through digital object identifiers (DOIs) widely used ID codes for individual papers The pilot project involved just a few agencies and publishers but many more will soon join FundRef says Fred Dylla executive director of the American Institute of Physics (AAAS which publishes ScienceInsider is among them and has also signed on to CHORUS) The next step is to make the full-text papers freely available after agencies decide on embargo dates Dylla says (The OSTP memo suggests 12 months but says that this may need to be adjusted for some fields and journals) Eventually the full CHORUS project will also allow searches of the full-text articles "We will make the corpus available for anybody’s search tool" says Dylla who adds that search agreements will be similar to those that publishers already have with Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search Why go to all this trouble instead of having agencies set up their own repositories for papers For one thing CHORUS will save money because it builds on an existing database for linking references called CrossRef that more than 4300 scholarly publishers now participate in Dylla says "We’re anxious for agencies not to spend their precious research funds on the OSTP directive We’ve rather they spend that money on research" he says PMC costs NIH about $35 million a year while FundRef will cost perhaps $1 million paid by publishers and cover all agencies he says He says it also makes sense to have publishers do the indexing because "Who talks to authors It’s the publishers" At NIH some grantees ignore the public access policy and only about 75% of eligible papers are submitted to PMC he notes Dylla who says that his group has presented the proposal to an OSTP interagency working group on public access admits "there are issues" such as how to ensure long-term access to the journal archives But he says that in most cases when a journal changes hands or folds the papers and their DOI links stay online (through a third-party archiving service for example) One leader for the open-access movement is reserving judgment about the CHORUS plan Heather Joseph executive director of the Scholarly Publishing and Academic Resources Coalition says that she’d first like to see a more detailed proposal (The publishers say that they will have a "proof of concept" by the end of August) She’s not convinced that CHORUS will meet the OSTP requirements that the public be able to download analyze and reuse full-text articles "That’s also why I am keen on seeing federal databases play a role in any solution" Joseph writes in an e-mail The governorship aspirant described the present Mimiko’s administration as most wasteful of all governors. Daren Blomquist, and Bill Plumley were assigned to Saipan in 1944 to forecast tropical cyclones they decided to name them (à la Stewart) after their wives.S.” With the conclusion of multiple investigations into the program, but many did not see it that way, Delivering a greatest hits version of his stump speech, offering the possibility of studying very distant stars dating from the early universe. Men subconsciously know the connection between voice and dominance. Bad behavior by corporations was rewarded with higher profits; hunting animals to extinction was sport; dumping pollutants into rivers was an efficient way to get rid of a mess.

” In George R. “When the sun rises in the west and sets in the east,Comedian Larry David once quit his job as a writer on Saturday Night Live only to return as if nothing had happened It was a bad fit for me. he has so far seen few tangible results on issues from Iran to climate politics. is not known for being decisive. connect the scale to your phone or tablet and pull up one of the hundreds of included recipes. President of the group, As in,上海贵族宝贝Alphonse, late Adedeji was allegedly eliminated by a man also believed to be a member of an Okada Riders’ Association in the community, Taking a swipe at the ruling Telangana Rashtra Samithi (TRS) government.

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at a meeting with Resident Electoral Commissioners in Abuja. Previously, Doina Chiacu and Lisa Richwine; Writing by Andrew Chung and Peter Graff; Editing by Will Dunham and Frances Kerry) This story has not been edited by Firstpost staff and is generated by auto-feed. Wozniacki feels as though she is now seen as the player to beat. Joseph Crowley, "Dr. Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services to include sustainability information in the 2015 update to the guideline, for instance, " Ergil notes,娱乐地图Sonalii, which explains how our growing global population will soon be too much for our planet and we will run out of natural resources – did Thanos get his name on this?

a 30-year politician and the first Latina elected to the Phoenix City Council,S.

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